Compound Sentence | Definition Examples, Exercise, Structure

Definition of Compound Sentence

A compound sentence is a sentence that contains two or more independent clauses, which are usually joined by a coordinating conjunction (such as “and,” “but,” or “or”) or by a semicolon.

Each independent clause has its own subject and predicate, and can stand alone as a complete sentence. In a compound sentence, the independent clauses are of equal importance and are connected to express a more complex thought or idea.

The use of a compound sentence can make writing more interesting and dynamic, and can help to convey more than one idea in a single sentence.

Compound Sentence Examples

Here are some examples of compound sentences:

I wanted to go to the beach, but it was raining outside.

She sings absoluyely beautifully, and she plays the guitar well.

He drank his coffee quickly, then he left for work.

I’m going to make dinner, and you can set the table.

We can go to the park, or we can stay home and watch a movie.

I didn’t study for the test, yet I still managed to pass it.

The sun was shining brightly, so we decided to go for a walk.

He loves playing video games, but he hates doing homework.

She didn’t like the book, but she enjoyed the movie adaptation.

He is a talented musician; he can play multiple instruments and compose his own songs.

Compound Sentence Structure

A compound sentence typically follows this structure:

Independent clause + coordinating conjunction + independent clause.

Or

Independent clause; independent clause.

Here’s a breakdown of each component:

Independent clause: A clause that can stand alone as a sentence because it contains a subject and a verb and expresses a complete thought.

Example: “I am going to the store.”

Coordinating conjunction: It is a word that joins two independent clauses.

Examples: and, but, or, so, yet, for, nor.

Semicolon: A punctuation mark used to connect two independent clauses when a coordinating conjunction is not used.

Example: “I am going to the cooperative store; I need to buy some bread.”

When constructing a compound sentence, it’s important to ensure that each independent clause is related in meaning and that the coordinating conjunction or semicolon used is appropriate for the context of the sentence.

Additionally, proper punctuation must be used to separate the independent clauses.

Rules for Compound Sentences

Here are some important rules to keep in mind when forming a compound sentence:

A compound sentence is made up of two or more independent clauses that are joined together. An independent clause, a complete sentence, can stand alone.

The independent clauses in a compound sentence can be joined together using coordinating conjunctions, semicolons, or conjunctive adverbs.

The coordinating conjunctions that are commonly used to join independent clauses are: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. These conjunctions can be referred with the acronym “FANBOYS.”

When using a coordinating conjunction to join two independent clauses, a comma is typically used before the conjunction.

A semicolon can be used to connect each other two closely related independent clauses.

Conjunctive adverbs such as however, therefore, moreover, and nonetheless can also be used to join independent clauses, but they require a semicolon before and a comma after.

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Each independent clause in a compound sentence should be able to stand alone as a complete sentence.

A compound sentence can be used to add variety and complexity to writing, but it is important to use it appropriately to avoid run-on sentences or other grammar errors.

Remembering these rules can help you create well-formed and grammatically correct compound sentences in your writing.

Compound Sentence Exercise

Here’s an exercise:

Combine each pair of sentences below to create a compound sentence using a coordinating conjunction or semicolon.

She loves to sing. She also plays the piano.

The dog barked loudly. The cat ran away.

He went to the store. He forgot his wallet.

The movie was boring. I fell asleep.

She studied hard. She passed the exam.

Possible answers:

She loves to sing, and she also plays the piano.

The dog barked loudly, so the cat rushed away.

He went to the cooperative store, but he forgot his wallet.

The movie was not very interesting, so I fell asleep.

She worked hard in her studies, and she passed the exam.

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Note: There are different ways to construct a compound sentence using coordinating conjunctions or semicolons, and the choice of conjunction or semicolon may vary depending on the intended meaning and context of the sentence.

Joining Compound Sentences with Coordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions are used to join two independent clauses (complete sentences that can stand alone) to create a compound sentence. The most common coordinating conjunctions are:

For

And

Nor

But

Or

Yet

So

Here are some examples of how to join compound sentences using coordinating conjunctions:

I wanted to go to the market at grocery store, but it was closed.

She loves to read books, and he enjoys watching movies.

He didn’t study for the examination well, so he failed it.

I can either go to the party or stay home for rest.

They couldn’t decide where to eat, nor could they agree on a movie.

The weather was terrible, yet we still went for a walk.

Remember that coordinating conjunctions are used to join two independent clauses, so each clause should be able to stand alone as a complete sentence.

Joining Compound Sentences with Semicolons

Semicolons can be used to join two independent clauses that are closely related in meaning, creating a compound sentence. Here are some examples of how to join compound sentences using semicolons:

I have a busy day ahead; I need to finish my report and attend a meeting.

She loves to play tennis; he prefers to swim.

We can go to the beach; alternatively, we can go hiking in the mountains.

The weather is beautiful today; let’s go for a picnic in the park.

I have been working hard all week; I deserve a break this weekend.

Note that the independent clauses should be closely related in meaning, and semicolons are used instead of coordinating conjunctions to show a stronger relationship between the two clauses.

Also, remember that each clause should be able to stand alone as a complete sentence.

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Joining Compound Sentences with Conjunctive Adverbs

Semicolons can be used to join two independent clauses that are closely related in meaning, creating a compound sentence. Here are some examples of how to join compound sentences using semicolons:

I have a busy day ahead; I need to finish my report and attend a meeting.

She loves to play tennis; he prefers to swim.

We can go to the beach; alternatively, we can go hiking in the mountains.

The weather is beautiful today; let’s go for a picnic in the park.

I have been working hard all week; I deserve a break this weekend.

Note that the independent clauses should be closely related in meaning, and semicolons are used instead of coordinating conjunctions to show a stronger relationship between the two clauses.

Also, remember that each clause should be able to stand alone as a complete sentence.

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